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7 Books in 1: The Railway Children, Five Children and It, The Phoenix and the Carpet, The Story of the Amulet, The Story of the Treasure-Seekers, The Would-Be-Goods, and The Enchanted Castle

Press: Shoes and Ships and Sealing Wax Ltd (December 1, 2004)
Publication Date:2004-12
ISBN:9780954840129
Author Name:Nesbit, E.
Pages:584
Language:English

Content

J K Rowling, Edinburgh International Book Festival, August 15, 2004: "I love E Nesbit - I think she is great and I identify with the way that she writes."  Classic stories by much-loved children's author E. 
Nesbit.
This book contains seven full-length novels.
Set in an England of steam-trains and magic, generations of children have thrilled to these exciting adventures.
When the children in these stories aren't preventing a train crash, you'll find them flying on a magic carpet, travelling through time with an enchanted Egyptian amulet, hatching the egg of the mythical phoenix, or using their magical ring to explore an enchanted castle This '7 books in 1' edition is an ideal gift for any child who loves reading, or any adult who wants to bring some magic into their life! The Railway Children 'The train wouldn't care.
It would go rushing by them and tear round the corner and go crashing into that awful mound.
And everyone would be killed.
Her hands grew very cold and trembled so that she could hardly hold the flag.
And then came the distant rumble and hum of the metals, and a puff of white steam showed far away along the stretch of line.' Five Children and It The Psammead is a small, furry animal from thousands of years ago that has eyes on long horns like a snail's eves, ears like a bat's ears, and a tubby body shaped like a spider's and covered with thick soft fur; its arms and legs are furry too, and it has hands and feet like a monkey's.
But the best thing about the Psammead is that it can grant wishes.
The Phoenix and The Carpet (also known as 'The Phoenix and The Wishing Carpet') When the children from "Five Children and It" accidentally hatch the egg of the mythical Phoenix, it shows them how to use their magic carpet to travel anywhere they want...
and a whole new round of adventures begins! The Story of The Amulet The children's mother is very ill, and their father has been sent abroad on business.
With both their parents away, they discover their old friend the Psammead - captured and put up for sale! If only they could get wishes from the Psammead, they could wish their mother well again, and wish their father home.
But the Psammead can't give them any more wishes.
Luckily it knows where they can find an ancient Egyptian amulet that could give them their 'heart's desire' - if only it was in one piece! The Story of the Treasure Seekers "'I'll tell you what, we must go and seek for treasure: it is always what you do to restore the fallen fortunes of your House.'" When the Bastable family runs short of money, the children decide it's up to them to find a way to restore their family fortunes.
Will they succeed in rescuing their father from the visits of policeman and debt collectors? The Would-Be-Goods The Bastable children behave so badly that their father sends them away to live in the countryside.
Determined to be good in the future, they form a society, the 'Wouldbegoods', for being good in.
But things don't go exactly as they plan...
The Enchanted Castle Sent to live in the countryside for the summer, Jerry, Jimmy and Cathleen discover a secret castle containing a sleeping princess - and (although he's worried that she might slap him for it) one of the boys kisses her, and she wakes up.
But shouldn't a real princess be taller? Is the castle really enchanted - or was the 'princess' just pretending?

From the Publisher

Classic stories by much-loved children's author E. 
Nesbit.
This book contains seven full-length novels.
Set in a 1900s England of steam-trains and magic, generations of children have thrilled to these exciting adventures.
When the children in these stories aren't preventing a train crash, you'll find them getting wishes from the sandy Psammead, flying on a magic carpet, travelling through time with an enchanted Egyptian amulet, hatching the egg of the mythical phoenix, or using their magical ring to explore an enchanted castle! The brothers and sisters created by E.
Nesbit have the convincing and realistic feeling of being a real family - they're usually disagreeing with each other, but they're always cheerful about it.
They try to be good but are always in trouble of one kind or another.
With a subtle ethical message underlying their exciting plots, these novels have been recommended childrens literature for many years.
This '7 books in 1' edition is an ideal gift for any child who loves reading, or any adult who wants to bring some magic into their life!

From the Inside Flap

Classic stories by much-loved children's author E. 
Nesbit.
This book contains seven full-length novels.
Set in an England of steam-trains and magic, generations of children have thrilled to these exciting adventures.
When the children in these stories aren't preventing a train crash, you'll find them flying on a magic carpet, travelling through time with an enchanted Egyptian amulet, hatching the egg of the mythical phoenix, or using their magical ring to explore an enchanted castle The brothers and sisters created by E.
Nesbit have a convincing and realistic feeling of being a real family - they're usually disagreeing with each other, but they're always cheerful about it.
They try to be good but are always in trouble of one kind or another.
With a subtle ethical message underlying their exciting plots, these novels have been recommended children's literature for many years.
This '7 books in 1' edition is an ideal gift for any child who loves reading, or any adult who wants to bring some magic into their life!

--This text refers to the Paperback edition.

From the Back Cover

Rock and trees and grass and bushes, with a rushing sound, slipped right away from the face of the cutting and fell on the line with a blundering crash that could have been heard half a mile off. 
A cloud of dust rose up.
"Oh," said Peter, in awestruck tones, "isn't it exactly like when coals come in? -- if there wasn't any roof to the cellar and you could see down." "Look what a great mound it's made!" said Bobbie.
"Yes," said Peter, slowly.
He was still leaning on the fence.
"Yes," he said again, still more slowly.
Then he stood upright.
"The 11.29 down hasn't gone by yet.
We must let them know at the station, or there'll be a most frightful accident." "Let's run," said Bobbie, and began.
But Peter cried, "Come back!" and looked at Mother's watch.
He was very prompt and businesslike, and his face looked whiter than they had ever seen it.
"No time," he said; "it's two miles away, and it's past eleven." "Couldn't we," suggested Phyllis, breathlessly, "couldn't we climb up a telegraph post and do something to the wires?" "We don't know how," said Peter.
"They do it in war," said Phyllis; "I know I've heard of it."

About the Author

A British writer born in London, Edith was educated at various schools in England, France and Germany, before her family finally settled in England at the age of 13. 
Her poems started being published in magazines from the age of 15.
Founding member of the socialist, educational Fabian Society along with her first husband Hubert Bland and George Bernard Shaw; her literary circle also included British writers H.
G.
Wells and Laurence Housman.
She took up writing to support her family's unstable finances.
She also published poetry and novels for adults under the pen names of Fabian Bland and E.
Bland.

Excerpt. © Reprinted by permission. All rights reserved.

Rock and trees and grass and bushes, with a rushing sound, slipped right away from the face of the cutting and fell on the line with a blundering crash that could have been heard half a mile off. 
A cloud of dust rose up.
"Oh," said Peter, in awestruck tones, "isn't it exactly like when coals come in?—if there wasn't any roof to the cellar and you could see down." "Look what a great mound it's made!" said Bobbie.
"Yes," said Peter, slowly.
He was still leaning on the fence.
"Yes," he said again, still more slowly.
Then he stood upright.
"The 11.29 down hasn't gone by yet.
We must let them know at the station, or there'll be a most frightful accident." "Let's run," said Bobbie, and began.
But Peter cried, "Come back!" and looked at Mother's watch.
He was very prompt and businesslike, and his face looked whiter than they had ever seen it.
"No time," he said; "it's two miles away, and it's past eleven." "Couldn't we," suggested Phyllis, breathlessly, "couldn't we climb up a telegraph post and do something to the wires?" "We don't know how," said Peter.
"They do it in war," said Phyllis; "I know I've heard of it." "They only CUT them, silly," said Peter, "and that doesn't do any good.
And we couldn't cut them even if we got up, and we couldn't get up.
If we had anything red, we could get down on the line and wave it." "But the train wouldn't see us till it got round the corner, and then it could see the mound just as well as us," said Phyllis; "better, because it's much bigger than us." "If we only had something red," Peter repeated, "we could go round the corner and wave to the train." "We might wave, anyway." "They'd only think it was just US, as usual.
We've waved so often before.
Anyway, let's get down." They got down the steep stairs.
Bobbie was pale and shivering.
Peter's face looked thinner than usual.
Phyllis was red-faced and damp with anxiety.
"Oh, how hot I am!" she said; "and I thought it was going to be cold; I wish we hadn't put on our—" she stopped short, and then ended in quite a different tone—"our flannel petticoats." Bobbie turned at the bottom of the stairs.
"Oh, yes," she cried; "THEY'RE red! Let's take them off." They did, and with the petticoats rolled up under their arms, ran along the railway, skirting the newly fallen mound of stones and rock and earth, and bent, crushed, twisted trees.
They ran at their best pace.
Peter led, but the girls were not far behind.
They reached the corner that hid the mound from the straight line of railway that ran half a mile without curve or corner.
"Now," said Peter, taking hold of the largest flannel petticoat.
"You're not"—Phyllis faltered—"you're not going to TEAR them?" "Shut up," said Peter, with brief sternness.
"Oh, yes," said Bobbie, "tear them into little bits if you like.
Don't you see, Phil, if we can't stop the train, there'll be a real live accident, with people KILLED.
Oh, horrible! Here, Peter, you'll never tear it through the band!" She took the red flannel petticoat from him and tore it off an inch from the band.
Then she tore the other in the same way.
"There!" said Peter, tearing in his turn.
He divided each petticoat into three pieces.
"Now, we've got six flags." He looked at the watch again.
"And we've got seven minutes.
We must have flagstaffs." The knives given to boys are, for some odd reason, seldom of the kind of steel that keeps sharp.
The young saplings had to be broken off.
Two came up by the roots.
The leaves were stripped from them.
"We must cut holes in the flags, and run the sticks through the holes," said Peter.
And the holes were cut.
The knife was sharp enough to cut flannel with.
Two of the flags were set up in heaps of loose stones between the sleepers of the down line.
Then Phyllis and Roberta took each a flag, and stood ready to wave it as soon as the train came in sight.
"I shall have the other two myself," said Peter, "because it was my idea to wave something red." "They're our petticoats, though," Phyllis was beginning, but Bobbie interrupted— "Oh, what does it matter who waves what, if we can only save the train?" Perhaps Peter had not rightly calculated the number of minutes it would take the 11.29 to get from the station to the place where they were, or perhaps the train was late.
Anyway, it seemed a very long time that they waited.
Phyllis grew impatient.
"I expect the watch is wrong, and the train's gone by," said she.
Peter relaxed the heroic attitude he had chosen to show off his two flags.
And Bobbie began to feel sick with suspense.
It seemed to her that they had been standing there for hours and hours, holding those silly little red flannel flags that no one would ever notice.
The train wouldn't care.
It would go rushing by them and tear round the corner and go crashing into that awful mound.
And everyone would be killed.
Her hands grew very cold and trembled so that she could hardly hold the flag.
And then came the distant rumble and hum of the metals, and a puff of white steam showed far away along the stretch of line.
"Stand firm," said Peter, "and wave like mad! When it gets to that big furze bush step back, but go on waving! Don't stand ON the line, Bobbie!" The train came rattling along very, very fast.

--This text refers to the Paperback edition.

Tags

Children's Books,Classics

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Comment List (Total:12)

  •     Before viewing the movie Five Children and It, I had never heard of the author E. Nesbit. I was delighted to unearth her works from the early 20th century England. Ms. Nesbit has an engaging style and aside from the actual story, I learned a great deal about life during that time period. Better written than many current children's literature, I highly recommend these books.

  •     7 adventure stories as one book - good value. Exciting stories, good for older children.

  •     This is a great all in one volume! We are enjoying it this year!

  •     The seven most popular children's books by classic author Edith Nesbit. Great for adults to revisit - a good gift for any kid who loves to read.

  •     Great stories about some different groups of children and their adventures. I would recommend it as a Christmas or birthday present for any kid!

  •     Love the stories, but there are far better productions of them elsewhere. Hardback or soft, this book was produced cheaply and looks much more like a text book than a book of stories for kids. As has already been described, tiny font, no illustrations, thin papers. I bought one for my family, and one for my 9 year old niece. I'll keep ours, as a reference book, just in case I can't find a better version of any of these stories in the future. But I can't give such an uninviting book to my niece. I'll find her proper versions of these books. I'd rather give her a nice used copy of an out of print production, than this book.

  •     I saw that people on here were moaning about the paperback, so I looked at book books in 'search inside the book' and got the hardback. Glad I did as the recipient really enjoyed it!

  •     I bought this book as a Christmas present for my niece, and she loves it. They're great stories, and this book made a much better present than just buying one of them.I can't understand what the reviewer below is talking about: if he wanted a hardcover, why did he buy the paperback? And with 7 books inside it, if the text wasn't fairly small then the whole thing would be really big and heavy!So here's my recommendations: - click on the book image and look 'inside-the-book' before you buy it, so you know what you're getting. - if you want the hardcover edition, don't buy the paperback (duh!)

  •     These are some of the most delightful books for children ever written. Better than Lewis. Better than Milne. Better than Ransome. Long out of copyright, even by today's standards. Gather up her best in one book. Wonderful idea. Oh! Yes this is a great bargain. Unless.This is a paperback, not a hardback. And the type is very small. Very! But the two columns per page alleviates that somewhat. Only somewhat. But no illustrations. Just page after page of type; so, not as bad as a 1900 newspaper, but unappealing and unfriendly. I think the versions I read long ago had illustrations by Ernest Shepherd. Ohhhh, that is a loss....Think about this. Two small-print columns per page, no illustrations, a floppy paperback printed on what appears to be cheap paper. This is not for a child to read.I wish I had had a chance to see this in advance. Seek elsewhere for these treasures.

  •     I read a few of these stories as a child and bought this for my child. I forgot how wonderful the stories are, and it's so nice to have 7 of them in one book!

  •     You get a set of E. Nesbit's seven most popular children's books, printed together in one volume. This is enough to keep you going for quite a long time, even if you're a very determined reader!The stories are about groups of children, who have adventures when their parents go away (for different reasons). They're in a couple of sequences - 'The Railway Children' stands by itself, then there's three books about the same group of children ('Five Children and It', 'The Phoenix and The Carpet', and 'The Story of the Amulet'), then two about a different family (the Bastables: 'The Story of the Treasure-Seekers' and 'The Would-be-goods'), then 'The Enchanted Castle' is another one-off.Some of these stories feature magic in a Harry Potter kind of way - that's the three 'Five Children' stories and 'The Enchanted Castle' - while the others are about the children's adventures within the normal Edwardian world - that's 'The Railway Children' and the Bastable stories.E. Nesbit - the author - is strongly recommended by JK Rowling, the author of the Harry Potter books. She's said in a number of press interviews that she really admires the writing of Nesbit, and models her own writing style on Nesbit's.I'd recommend these books - they're very engaging and easy to read, and you really do want to keep turning the pages to find out what happens next! There's enough here to keep you going for a long time, too.

  •     These books may be charming, but this edition 7-in-1 is awful - the print is so small that it is virtually unreadable. Very disappointing!

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