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Taran Wanderer

Press: USBORNE PUBLISHING; New Ed edition (September 30, 2005)
Publication Date:2005-9
ISBN:9780746068397
Author Name:Alexander, Lloyd
Language:English

Content

Taran Wanderer, the fourth book in Lloyd Alexander's The Chronicles of PrydainTaran is an Assistant Pig-Keeper no longer--he has become a hero. 
Now he dreams of winning the hand of Princess Eilonwy, but how can someone who has spent his whole life caring for a pig hope to marry royalty? Taran must find out who he really is.
Eager to learn his origins and hoping to discover noble roots, Taran sets off with the faithful Gurgi.The journey takes the companions to the three witches in the Marshes of Morva and through the many realms of Prydain.
At last they reach the mystical Mirror of Llunet, which reveals a person's true identity.
Yet Taran may not be ready to face the truth.
.
.
.Includes a new pronunciation guide.

From the Publisher

Taran, the assistant pig-keeper who wants to be a hero, goes  questing for knowledge of his parentage, hoping that his journey will  ennoble him in the eyes of Eilonwy, the princess with the red-gold  hair. 
Accompanied by several loyal friends, Taran begins his search when three wily enchantresses of the Marshes of Morva send him to consult the Mirror of Llunet for the answers he is seeking, cryptically promising that "the finding takes no more than the looking." During his adventures he meets Craddoc, the shepherd, and the common people of Prydain, whom he comes to respect and admire.
With their help, he continues his mission to learn the secret of the Mirror and the truth about himself.

--This text refers to an out of print or unavailable edition of this title.

From the Inside Flap

Taran, the assistant pig-keeper who wants to be a hero, goes questing for knowledge of his parentage, hoping that his journey will ennoble him in the eyes of Eilonwy, the princess with the red-gold hair. 
Accompanied by several loyal friends, Taran begins his search when three wily enchantresses of the Marshes of Morva send him to consult the Mirror of Llunet for the answers he is seeking, cryptically promising that "the finding takes no more than the looking." During his adventures he meets Craddoc, the shepherd, and the common people of Prydain, whom he comes to respect and admire.
With their help, he continues his mission to learn the secret of the Mirror and the truth about himself.

--This text refers to an out of print or unavailable edition of this title.

About the Author

Lloyd Alexander (1924-2007) was the author of more than forty books for children and adults, including the beloved children's fantasy series, the Chronicles of Prydain, one of the most widely read series in the history of fantasy and the inspiration for the animated Disney film, The Black Cauldron. 
His books have won numerous awards, including the Newbery Medal, the Newbery Honor, and the National Book Award for Juvenile Literature.

--This text refers to the Hardcover edition.

From AudioFile

When Taran sets out to find out his parentage, he leaves the familiar behind and ventures to the far corners of Prydain. 
When three enchantresses tell him of the Mirror of Llunet and what it might offer, Taran is fixed on his destination.
On his quest, he tangles with despicable folk, meets the honest people of the Free Commons, and comes to understand much about himself.
Once again, James Langton's narration is outstanding.
The earnestness of Taran in both joy and anguish, as well the liveliness of the supporting characters, is memorable.
With tempo and lilt, he beckons the listener into the mists and mountains of the Welsh countryside that provides the background for this fourth book in the Prydain Chronicles.
A.R.
Winner of AudioFile Earphones Award © AudioFile 2005, Portland, Maine-- Copyright © AudioFile, Portland, Maine

--This text refers to an out of print or unavailable edition of this title.

Tags

Children's Books,Action & Adventure,Literature & Fiction

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Comment List (Total:17)

  •     For those who read the Chronicles of Prydain when they were kids, they know these books books well. I just found my old books which had very small writing and was looking for a new version of those books. This series release is fantastic. The type font and spacing is perfect for kids. The story itself falls along the lines of the other Chronicle of Prydain books, with Taran adventuring into the world with his various companions as he continues his own self exploration. The language is age appropriate, not dated, and a great read.

  •     Great

  •     My son enjoyed this!

  •     Fantastic story, told with the idea of giving a hero multiple villains to face as well as meaningful relationships along the way.

  •     My favorite of the Prydain books!

  •     The purpose of this book (hopefully I'm not giving away too much of the story here) is basically to further develop the main protagonist's (that'd Taran of Caer Dallben) character before sending him off to the grand finale in the 5th and last book of the series (The High King). I believe I read somewhere that this was actually written AFTER Lloyd Alexander finished a complete draft of The High King, and then he wrote this because he decided Taran's character needed some more development. This story takes longer to get through than any other, which is not a big deal for me today, but the first time I read this series when I was maybe 13 (which is really a LOT closer to the audience I suspect Lloyd Alexander had in mind when he wrote the Chronicles of Prydain series), it felt really long. Anyway, aside from the relative length (which is both a good and bad thing), this book has the same strengths and weaknesses as all the series: The weakness is the plot is a bit contrived compared to the very best fantasy novels I've ever read (Tolkien), though I've certainly read fantasy books with bigger plot holes as well, and the plot here is probably tighter than in any of the other books in this series. In contrast, even though these are relatively short books that were probably aimed for kids in middle school, the main characters have depth, staying power, and evolve through each book, and there are basic moral themes present throughout every book (for example power leads to temptation and corruption) that seem even more relevant to me now nearly 20 years after I had to read "The Book of Three" in school. Highly recommended for anyone in the target audience, and still a decent (if short) read for an adult.

  •     I love this book, it's one of my favorites in my favorite series. Now that I've studied the Odyssey and the Aenead I see a lot of parallels. Great read!

  •     Great Gift

  •     Good Book

  •     The fourth installment of the Prydain Chronicles takes on a different tone from the other books. Many list this one as their least favorite, but it is a vital part of Taran's...

  •     Whereas the three previous books dealt with adventure and quests, this one is highly introspective on the part of Taran. Hence, I find this book to be the greatest of the Pentalogy. It has the wit and great writing that I've come to expect of Lloyd Alexander, with something intrinsically different, in that the focus on something other than a fast paced adventure.

  •     a bit musty cover but cd's seem fine.

  •     The book was written in the late sixties for children to be read (that is: not to be interpreted by film makers). The language is very well suited for this purpose.I read the 5 books that make up the Chronicles of Prydain in the late seventies, then read then to my sons in the late eighties, then had then in my elementary class in the nineties. If all the children had to mark these Lloyd Alexanden works, I'm sure they would give it top marks - so much so, that one of the five got 'lost' in my class: Taran Wanderer.Now I've got Taran back, and the book is still very readable. The quest is as big as any other fantasy book, but the humour that shines through is greater, the moods more subtle. Alexander once said (Author's note in The Castle of Llyr) that "The nature of fantasy allows happenings which reveal most clearly our own frailties and our own strengths. The inhabitants of Prydain are fantasy figures: I hope they are also human".If you measure how real people are by the times they crop up in idle chit-chat in your family, Taran, Eilonwy, Gurgi and Fflewddur Fflam are as alive now as they were when I started reading their story to my sons 30 years ago.I suggest you and your (grand)children enjoy all five books:- The Book of Three- The Black Cauldron- The Castlde of Llyr- Taram Wanderer- The High King

  •     I was a little guy when I first came across the Prydain Chronicles. I had long since lost the books and had forgotten that they even existed. And then one day I saw "The Black Cauldron" on sale for 25 cents at a Garage Sale. Right away my mind jumped back to my youth. Needless, to say I bought the book as well as the complete set. Now that I am an adult I am amazed at how inspiring the books are. There is so much behind the words written in these books and I am grateful that I took the time to re-read them 15 years later! I think the idea of Taran searching for his history is reflective of many things in the lives of all people - young and old! There is a magic to these pages that I hope will not become a rarity in books written by todays authors. Alexander doesn't write books, he creates visions. I'm just glad that he decided to share his visions with many others.

  •     This is the fourth book in the Prydain Chronicles, a series I have adored since childhood. Lloyd Alexander has a lovely way of revisiting standard fantasy tropes and looking at them from a different angle, while still making them feel completely organic to the story. While this is my least favourite of the five books (I do miss the presence of most of the recurring characters from the rest of the series) and decidedly more serious in tone than the first three, it's still a great read, and sets things up nicely for the more action-packed fifth and final book. In some ways, this one reads more like a series of short stories than a novel, which was a little jarring at first but quick to get used to. When I first read it, I was around nine years old, and the resolution of the central conflict sort of baffled me, but once I got a little older I loved how the author handled it. A wonderful book, especially as part of the series as a whole.

  •     I love the entire series and think as a whole the Chronicles of Prydain deserves 5 stars. I've been reading the series to my daughter (she was 8 when I began the series but will soon be 9) and she's enjoyed them much as I enjoyed them as a child. But Taran Wanderer was probably the least enjoyable of the books for her. It is a little dense, not as action packed and focused so much on Taran (rather than Eilonwy) making it a little less enjoyable than the others.

  •     The fourth book in the Chronicles of Prydain, Taran Wanderer is a departure from the previous books. Eilonwy doesn't appear in this book and there is no set adventure.

 

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